Jeanette Winterson

Jeanette Winterson

Author

Jeanette Winterson was born in Manchester and raised in Lancashire, by adoptive parents. She was raised in the Elim Pentecostal Church and, intending to become a Pentecostal Christian Missionary she began evangelising and writing sermons at age six. By age 16 Winterson left home. She soon after read for a degree in English at St Catherine’s College, Oxford.

After moving to London, her first novel, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, was published when she was 24 years old. It won the 1985 Whitbread Black for a First Novel, and was adapted  by Winterson in 1990, which in turn won the BAFTA Award for Best Drama. She won the 1987 John Llewellyn Rhys Prize for The Passion.

Winterson’s subsequent novels explore the boundaries of physicality and the imagination, gender polarities, and sexual identities, and have won several literary awards. Her stage adaptation of The PowerBook in 2002 opened at the Royal National Theatre, London. She also bought a house in Spitalfields  east London, which she refurbished into a flat as a pied-a-terre and a ground-floor shop, Verde’s, to sell organic food.

Jeanette also writes for many prominent publications including the Guardian, Times, Daily Mail, Observer, New York Times, and Harpers Bazaar, and has featured on BBC Radio 4’s Woman’s Hour.

Winterson was made an officer of Order of the British Empire (OBE) at the 2006 New Year Honours.

Contact

Lighthousekeeping @Wintersonworld

Trying to get to Manchester and now it is snowing !

Reading room fire burning down. Must be time for bed. Lovely peaceful evening with books ( and whisky )

So it begins . See my previous Tweet as Cummings and Co start banning journalists Trump style .

Political journalists boycott No 10 briefing after reporter ban https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2020/feb/03/political-journalists-boycott-no-10-briefing-after-reporter-ban

Hey @BorisJohnson and @Nigel_Farage, we just made Big Ben bong for you😉. Sound on.

BREXIT!! I will be on BBC Newsnight tonight 1030. Love it or hate it, it’s here .

Nero at rest. He loves a wood fire and so do I.

Gary Lineker crisp chomping Match of the Day presenter who was paid 1.75m by BBC last year thinks licence fee should be scrapped . It’s not all about football and crisps Gary.

Another misty moisty Saturday morning in the Slaughters ( where I live not what we do) Nero is after Fezz

Colette , the dog I borrow from Shakespeare and Company when I go to Paris

Andy Haldane, chief economist of the Bank of England says Britain’s low productivity is in part a result of low pay plus the easy hire and fire culture that depresses wages and creates zero job satisfaction . The answer? Pay people more and give them job security !

The moon over my house tonight

My Sunday night dinner. Local lamb cutlets and homegrown beetroot, turnip, carrots, cauliflower and the last of the sprout tops. Organic wine supplied by the great Vintage Roots company . I love a night in by myself

All from the garden . Grow your own in 2020 x

Bloody hell Nero! Pheasant is same size as you! Don’t worry Twitter folks; he didn’t catch it

Asda is closing all its fresh meat and fish counters , replacing with ready meals! It calls this consumer lifestyle alignment . It means more waste more nutritionally barren or unbalanced food and of course more profit for Asda.

Peace at last crazy cat

Oranges are not the only flower

Nero has now found the flowers .